Twenty Things to Know about #DHIB2017

Twenty Things to Know about #DHIB2017                                                 

DHIB 2017 (@DHIBeirut, dhibeirut.wordpress.com) is a moment in my career that I will look back on fondly.

I have made a list of twenty things to know about the event that took place in Beirut 10-12 March 2017, ten that I think others will be interested in, and ten personal ones.

  1. It was not the first successful international digital humanities event that has taken place in the Arab region. It was the second.
  2. It represents the convergence of two different Andrew J. Mellon Foundation funded initiatives: the Center for Arts and Humanities at AUB and the AMICAL consortium.
  3. Countries represented at DHIB 2017 were Egypt, UAE, Lebanon, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, France, Switzerland, Greece, Germany and Italy.  These are the countries of the institutions represented.  There were more nationalities present.
  4. It was the first time, to my knowledge, that instructors working in the Arab world–North Lebanon (Balamand), Beirut (AUB), Cairo (AUC)—taught DH topics together in the same venue.
  5. The participants included local universities, research centers and institutes, as well as digital humanities specialists from international organizations: IFPO, OIB and DiXiT, international libraries (Halle) and DH groups (Bard).
  6. Instructors included librarians, full-time and part-time faculty, IT and an English major.
  7. Participants included librarians, full-time faculty, IT, graduate and undergraduates.
  8. The digital humanities conversation has piqued the interest of the Centers for Teaching and Learning in the region and beyond.
  9. The courses on offer represented a spectrum of topics important to our local “big tent”:  Drupal, mapping, 3d, sound, Arabic OCR, Sustainable Text Workflows, Omeka, game design, digital pedagogy, digital editing, etc.
  10. We were able to offer the Institute at no cost to the participants.

 

Ten reasons that I loved the 2017 edition of DHIB 2017:

  1. I witnessed my fellow faculty, instructional designers and students make DH their own.
  2. The mother of an undergraduate student of mine took my workshop to find out what he has been talking about all this time.
  3. My keynote was live streamed and notes for several courses are available online.
  4. I listened to our second keynote speaker Ghassan Mourad, author of the first book about DH in Arabic, speak in Arabic about named entity extraction in Arabic.
  5. We have the best (multi-script) logo of any of the DH events I have attended (designed by @kyraneth). Available here with a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 International license.
  6. One of the participants in my mapping workshop grasped the idea of the experimental nature of the DH projectvery quickly.  He went looking for data, dug into my professional website and made a map of my recent professional engagements.
  7. Both the Office of Information Technology and the Library at AUB were actively engaged in the Institute.
  8. The lightning talks were effervescent: bubbling over with practical ideas, obvious cross-institutional partnerships and feasible projects.
  9. Our closing session was held en plein air on the 2nd floor balcony of Fisk Hall, one of the heritage buildings on AUB’s green oval.  I was very pleased with the engagement of the participants.
  10. I learned so much from others.

 

General information on DHIB and DH at AUB : We began with informal events in 2011 that brought together the departments of English and Computer Science at AUB, with the support of some key people on campus who believed in the endeavor.  In 2015 we hosted the first DHIB (documents about that event are archived here). We became part of the Digital Humanities International Training Network in 2015. Other DH institutes have received participants from our institution: Oxford, Leipzig, Victoria.

 

Articles written about DHIB 2017:

AUB Faculty of Arts and Sciences
D
igital Humanities Institute Beirut 2017 – a Review

 

 

 

 

Abstracts, American University of Paris, March 2017

Abstracts

 

David Joseph Wrisley
djwrisley.com @DJWrisley
American University of Paris
16-17 March 2017

 

Lecture: “Digital Project-Based Scholarship and Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts Institution”
Thursday, March 16, 2017, 1530-1700, Combes 102    Watch the lecture here.

My talk focuses on the genre of the digital project and its potential for scholarly and pedagogical reflection in the liberal arts institution.  From a general discussion of some exemplary projects carried out in small colleges by teams of faculty, students, librarians and technologists, in what might be called the humanities “laboratory” (Lane), I will chart how digital methods can evolve from course-embedded experiments to larger research projects.  I hope to show that such projects, in both process and product, embody the values of a liberal arts education in the 21st century: a well-rounded education, social and ethical awareness and creative, multidisciplinary synthesis.  I will discuss in detail two course-embedded digital projects that I carried out with my students in Beirut: Linguistic Landscapes of Beirut and Mapping Beirut Print Culture.  As we will see, projects, like the scholars and institutions that embark upon them, grow in stages of increasing digital scholarly complexity (ILiADS).  Finally, I will point to some attempts to build “communities of practice” among liberal arts colleges, and the establishment of lab-like commons and other institutional structures that serve as the loci for such project-based local knowledge production.

 

Hands-on session: “Toolkit or Toychest?: the Digital in the Classroom”
Friday, March 17, 2017, 11h00 – 14h00, Combes 104

This hands on session will put into practice some of the ideas laid forth in Thursday’s lecture.  It will look at some simple, off-the-shelf tools for digital tasks, and move on to more complex (or even combined) tasks that are useful for collecting, analyzing and disseminating research data. The session aims to make participants aware of some of the emergent categories of tools for research & pedagogy, as well as to discuss the degrees of openness that they embody.  The session argues for the productive tension between the functional (the tool) and the ludic (the toy), suggesting that the digital does not simplify or merely quantify, but rather opens the door to critical play and reflection with tools.  Participants will try out basic functionality of some of the following environments and will discuss together how they might be integrated into critical classroom praxis: Voyant, TypeWright, FromThePage, Prism, Hypothes.is, Google Fusion Tables, TopoText, Odyssey.js, Palladio, NodeGoat, Sketchup, JSTOR analyze, ZoteroWordPress.org.  

Helpful, but not necessary, preparations for the workshop: Make accounts at TypeWrightHypothes.is, Google (if you have a gmail it is enough), Carto.  Download Sketchup and either Zotero standalone (and its Chrome plugin).

 

 

 

Additional Reading:

Bilansky “TypeWright: An Experiment in Participatory Curation
Doueihi, Pour un humanisme numérique
Dumouchel, “
Les Humanités Numériques: une nouvelle discipline universitaire?
dwhly, “Annotation is Now a Web Standard
El Khatib et al., “TopoText: Interactive Digital Mapping of Literary Text
Ferrari Nieto, Enrique. Resistencias con lo Digital
Gefen et al., “Qu’est-ce que les humanités numériques?
Jannidis et al., Digital Humanities: 
Eine Einführung
Lane, The Big Humanities
Liu, DH ToyChest
Mounier, ed. Read/Write Book 2: Une introduction aux humanités numériques
Nowviskie, “How to Play with Maps”
Numerico et al, L’umanista digitale (Eng tr. The Digital Humanist: A Critical Inquiry)
Burdick et al, Digital_Humanities
Puckett, 
Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers, and Educators
Rockwell and Sinclair, Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities
Sketchfab, “Around the World in 80 Models
Svensson, Big Digital Humanities
Unsworth, “Scholarly Primitives

A Very Gentle Intro to 3d and Sketchup DHIB 2017

Description:

This is a 2.5 hour course that introduces the use of 3d for the humanities and looks at Sketchup briefly.

Outcomes: 

Participants who complete this workshop will

    • explore some examples of 3d for the humanities 
    • discuss some theories of 3d for the humanities and potential applications
    • learn where they can get 3d shape files to begin to manipulate themselves
    • model a basic objects in Sketchup

Outline: 

(1) What is 3d? Why might we want to work in 3D? In what formats do 3d objects come?

(2) Where can we find open 3d content? SketchfabThingiverse3duniverse, Sketchup’s 3dwarehouse and Yeggi

(3) Examples of projects:  The Nilein Mosque (Sudan)1853 Richmond and its Slave MarketVirtual WilliamsburgA 3d model of the Abu Dhabi Volcano Fountain / Forma Urbis / Simulating Gothic Arches / Musée Charles X / What Jane Saw / Virtual Monastery / Off the Map / Rome Reborn / Mapping Soweto / Edge Hill 3D parametric modeling / Unity 3D Schooner / Hadrian’s Villa / 3DHOP / 1893 Columbian Exhibition / Virtual Harlem / The Sound of 18th century Paris / Virtual Paul’s Cross Project / Reconstituições virtuais de Teatros (Lisbon) / Visualizing Early Baltimore / Heritage Together / Z-axis Mapping / Triumphal Arch / Dubai 3d printed architecture 

(4) What would you model in 3d and why?

(4) Two hands-on examples:

a. Making a basic object (say, the Issam Fares Building designed by Zaha Hadid at AUB).

On this building see here.

b. Geolocating the object

(5) How can we share those objects in the medium? WordPress plugin

Readings: 

Champion, Playing with the Past.
Jaskot et al.Visualizing the Archive: Building at Auschwitz as a Geographic Problem”.
der Manuelian, “Giza 3d: The Real-Time Immersive Experience” Digital Giza, 124-153.
Kenderdine, “Embodiment, Entanglement, and Immersion in Digital Cultural Heritage” New Companion to Digital Humanities, 22-41.