NYU Abu Dhabi DH Meet Up schedule 2018-19

What is the Digital Humanities Meet Up? 

It is an informal get together featuring a wide array of topics for those interested in, or just curious about, the digital humanities.  It is co-sponsored by the NYU Abu Dhabi Center for Digital Scholarship and the Division of the Arts and Humanities.

 

When will it meet?  

It will meet for approximately one hour during the day every few weeks throughout the Fall and Spring semester.

 

Who can attend?

Anyone in the NYU Abu Dhabi community or beyond.  The meet up is designed to be a learning experience for all.  No particular technical knowledge is required. No RSVP required.

 

Have an idea for a future DH Meet Up? Let us know…

 

Fall 2018 schedule:

 

All meet ups are held in the NYU Abu Dhabi library, C2 329, unless noted below.

 

Wednesday, 19 September, 12-1pm  Taylor Hixson (NYUAD Library, Geospatial Services), Workshop: “An Introduction to Story Maps

 

Monday, 24 September, 1150-105pm  David Wrisley (NYUAD, Digital Humanities), Workshop: “Web Hosting and Digital Identity” 

 

Thursday, 4 October, 2-3pm –  Abdullah Heyari, (NYUAD, Center for Cybersecurity), Workshop: “LaTeX for complete beginners”

 

Monday, 8 October, 1150-105pm – Kaki King (Musician), “Data Not Found”  Different Location C3 116, NYU Abu Dhabi Arts Center

 

Sunday, 4 November, 12-1pm –  Jeremy Farrell (Emory, Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies) – Research presentation and hands on: “Network Approaches to Historical Religious Movements: Early Sufism (9th-10th c. CE) as a Case Study”

 

Tuesday, 20 November, 12-1pm  – David Wrisley (NYUAD, Digital Humanities)  Presentation and hands on: “WikiMedia and the UAE : On Freedom of Panorama, de minimis, and Visual Data in the Creative Commons”

 

Tuesday, 4 December, 12-1pm   –Taylor Hixson (NYUAD Library, Geospatial Services) “Archiving your Digital Spatial Objects in NYU’s Spatial Data Repository

 

Spring 2018 schedule (forthcoming)

Topics for next term:

Digital Scent

Social Networks and Entrepreneurship in the 19th century

Faculty Digital Archive and “green” repositories

 

 

Past DH Meet Ups :

Fall 2016

Spring 2017 

Fall 2017 – Spring 2018

 

 

Mapping for the Digital Humanities DHIB 2017

Mapping for the Digital Humanities

Digital Humanities Institute – Beirut in March 2017 (5 hours).
@DJWrisley

Description:

This is a five-hour course that introduces basic elements of modeling spatial data for the humanities, data creation with gazetteers and making simple interactive maps with a symbology appropriate to the data.

Outcomes: 

Participants who complete this workshop will

    • understand the basics of spatial data (formats, types, accuracy).
      gain a basic appreciation for the concept of data modeling
    • learn where they can get spatial data appropriate for humanities inquiry, or how they can create it themselves.
    • gain a basic appreciation of the critical, interpretative side of making a map.
    • experiment with extracting locations from text.
    • appreciate different kinds of spatial data curation (manual, semi-automatic and automatic).
    • use geolocation services on their smartphones to generate some basic data.
    • learn to make a basic interactive map using Carto (and within a web hosting, if skill level permits).

Outline: 

(1) What are spatial data, that is, the data we need to make basic maps?  In what formats, do such data come?

(2) Where can we obtain spatial data? How can we create spatial data?  What is a gazetteer?  What is a spatial repository?

(3) Examples of digital maps projects: Edmonton Pipelines, Mapping Dante, Year of the Riot, Harlem 1935,  London Chatty Map, Slave Revolt in Jamaica, Going to the Show, Mapping the Lake District: A Literary GIS, Linguistic Landscapes of Beirut, Digital Karnak, NYT’s pick, Wandering Rocks, NoSweatShakespeare map, (LOTRLife of Maya Angelou, Novel City Maps), Photogrammar, Literary Geographies of Christine de Pizan, Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, Mapping the Mahjar

(4) Two hands-on examples:

a. Making a map from a text in three “flavors”:  (1) manually (2) semi-automatically using TopoText and (3) automatically using a basic python script (adapted from here).

b. Making a map using data captured with smartphone apps.

(5) How can we stylize those maps and share them with others?

 

See the other spatial humanities workshops and courses I have given. And this bibliography from 2015.

NYU Abu Dhabi Digital Humanities Meetups 2016-17

What is the Digital Humanities Meet Up?  

It is an informal get together for anyone interested in, or just curious about, the digital humanities.  It is co-sponsored by the NYU Abu Dhabi Center for Digital Scholarship and the Division of the Arts and Humanities.  

When will it meet?  

It will meet during the lunchtime hour throughout the Fall and Spring semester every few weeks.  

Who can attend?

Anyone in the NYUAD community or beyond.  The meet up is designed to be a learning experience for all.  No particular technical knowledge is required.

Spring 2017:

Tues, 14 February 2017, 1150-105 C3 118 (Presentation): Mobile Data Collection for Documenting Historical Built Space   Amel Chabbi (TCA Abu Dhabi, Historical Environment Department) will come to speak with AHC-AD 141 Spatial Humanities about a project in the implementation phase that aims to document historical buildings in Abu Dhabi using the tool known as Collector for ArcGIS that facilitates mobile data collection.

Thurs, 23 February 2017, 1150-105, Archives and Special Collections, NYUAD Library C2 3rd floor (Practicum): Digitizing Historical Maps  This hands on session led by Rebecca Pittam, Nicholas Martin and David Wrisley will explore creating digital images of archival maps of different sizes and media for reuse in spatial humanities projects.

Tues, 28 February 2017, 1150-105, C3 118 (Hands-on): Exploring Digital Map Libraries  This session led by Beth Russell and David Wrisley will discuss digital map libraries, what kinds of maps can be found in them, issues of metadata as well as how they can be used in digitized, “georeferenced” form.

Tues, 28 March 2017, 1150-105, Center for Digital Scholarship conference room, NYUAD library (discussion):  What is Web Hosting?, and What is it Doing in the NYUAD Classroom?  This presentation address the use of web hosting in the classroom for written coursework.  It will be presented within the context of the domain of one’s own movement.  We will discuss and the kinds of public, digital, multimedia composition that it enables as well as the questions of audience.  NYUAD students building their own domains will attend and contribute to the discussion.

Mon-Wed, 10-12 April 2017, A6 (Hands-on Workshops) During our international conference Digital Humanities Abu Dhabi – DHAD there will be a number of digital humanities workshops.  These are open to the public, but require registration.  Check the schedule of workshops for updates.  If you would like to sign up for one of these free workshops, you can do so here.

Fall 2016:

Wednesday, 21 September 2016 (11.50am-1.05pm, Center for Digital Scholarship, C2, 3rd floor  PRACTICUM: Demystifying Digitization – This practicum is a part of David Wrisley’s course AHC-AD 139 (Introduction to Digital Humanities) that will be open Wednesday to the NYUAD community. Today’s practicum comes at a point of the semester when students are beginning to think about constructing their own private corpus of text. We will work with one of the best pieces of software for automatic transcription Abbyy FineReader to explore the process of optical character recognition (OCR) of printed texts in multiple languages including Arabic. We will discuss the class readings and do a hands on exercise with a few samples of text.  The exercise should illustrate the benefits and limitations of the digitization for texts of different periods and languages.  Topics of discussion include text archives, the hidden labor of digital texts, as well as digitization and loss.  (This practicum borrows its name from the digital humanities summer school being held in Antwerp next week.)

Monday, 17 October 2016 (1150-105, A6-016)  – UNDERGRADUATE DIGITAL HUMANITIES PRESENTATIONS This session co-led by David Wrisley and the students of his course AHC-AD 139 will feature low-barrier data visualization of textual corpora.  Students will each have built a small corpus in the language of their choice based on a research question they have.  They will be giving lightning presentations about their “distant readings” of this corpus.  These presentations, curated on the students’ sites, will be accompanied by general discussion.  

Wednesday, 23 November 2016 (1150-105, Center for Digital Scholarship, C2, 3rd floor) HANDS-ON LEARNING ABOUT GIS. To celebrate GIS Day 2016, come learn about Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with Matt Sumner and David Wrisley.  We will take a look at some maps made around the time of the unification of the UAE in the early 1970s and we will learn some basic skills useful for GIS like digitization and georeferencing.  We will also compare those maps with digital maps from today like Open Street Maps (OSM) and Google Maps and have a discussion about the different ways they represent the world we live in.  Read this post to learn about the results of this meetup.

Monday, 28 November 2016 (12-1, Center for Digital Scholarship conference room, C2, 3rd floor) – PROJECT PRESENTATION Akkasah.  Akkasah, the Center for Photography at NYU Abu Dhabi, explores the histories and contemporary practices of photography in the Arab world from comparative perspectives: it fosters the scholarly study of these histories and practices in dialogue with other photographic cultures and traditions from around the world. This presentation will engage with issues of image data and metadata, as well as digitization, preservation and collection curation.

Monday, 5 December 2016 (1150-105, TBA) – DIGITAL PUBLISHING IN PERFORMANCE AND ART  Today’s presentation will be given by Debra Levine about Scalar, Tome and other digital publishing platforms used by performance and cultural scholars as well as artists.  Deb will also introduce the Hemispheric Institute Digital Publishing initiative, drawing on some examples from it, her own work as well as projects carried out by NYUAD students.  The presentation will be followed by a open discussion.

 

 

 

MAA 2016 Toponymic Strata in a Large Corpus of Medieval French

David Joseph Wrisley
@DJWrisley
“Place in Corpora” panel
Medieval Academy of America
Boston, 26 February 2016

Computational models are “however finely perfected, they are temporary states in a process of coming to know, rather than fixed structures of knowledge.” (McCarty, 26)

A view from down under

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visualization 1:  Peripleo.  A geographic view of many different digital objects related to the places of Herodotus.  Click here to explore the same query live.

Herodotus at Peripleo

 

 

Visualization 2: The places of Joinville’s Vie de saint Louis, data by @DJWrisley

places of Joinville

 

Visualization 3: Top 50 Places names in the medieval French corpus.

Visualization 4: The literary geographies of the full corpus of Christine de Pizan.  Open geodata set by myself (about 1000 place names) for download.

CdeP

 

Visualization 5: Full dataset with a Time Slider (almost 10000 place names, 60% geocoded). 

VMP time slider

 

 

 

Visualization 6: A Faceted Browser for Placenames in Medieval (French) Literature (with Stefan Jaenicke, DH 2013) (almost 3000 place names).

Screenshot 2016-02-21 15.30.46

 

Visualization 7: Medieval French corpus place names layover with high population areas c 1300. (base map: Richard Hoffmann)

Visualization 8: Medieval French corpus place names layover with agricultural systems c. 1300. (base map: Richard Hoffmann)


Visualization 9: Comparative Cross-Language Literary Geographies of Marian poetry: Gautier de Coincy, Gonzalo de Berceo, Alfonso el Sabio (Old French, Castilian, Galician) (608 points) (map data by myself)


Visualization 10: Comparative Arabic-French late Medieval Historiography (al-Nuwairi Al-Iskandarani vs. Guillaume de Machaut) (map data by myself, accessible color palette)

 

 

Non-Embedded Works Mentioned:

“Australia on top down under!” Nucolorvue Productions PTY Ltd.

Center for Medieval Studies / Fordham University (2016). Exploring Place in the French of Italy.

Doueihi, M. (2011). Pour un humanisme numérique. Paris: Seuil.

Elliot, T. and S. Gillies (2009). “Digital Geography and Classics“ DHQ 3.1

Hoffmann, R. (2014).  An Environmental History of Medieval Europe. Cambridge: CUP.

Jessop, M. (2008). “The Inhibition of Geographic Information in Digital Humanities Scholarship” LLC 23.1: 39-50.

Mostern, R. et al (2016, forthcoming) Placing Names: Enriching and Integrating Gazetteers. Bloomington: Indiana UP.

Presner, T. and D. Shepard (2016). Mapping the Geospatial Turn” The New Companion to Digital Humanities. Malden, MA/Oxford: Wiley Blackwell.

Simon, R. et al. (2016).  “Peripleo: a Tool for Exploring Heterogeneous Data through the Dimensions of Space and Time”  Code4Lib 31.

Stoa Consortium (2016). Pleiades.

Suard, F. (2011). Guide de la chanson de geste et sa postérité littéraire. Paris: Champion.

Turnator, E. (2015). Summary of the Proceedings of the Linking the Middle Ages“ Workshop.

Wrisley, D. (2016). Visualizing Medieval Places.

Linguistic Landscapes at Scale

Linguistic Landscapes at Scale: Affordances and Limitations of a Mobile Data Collection Approach
David Joseph Wrisley

Abstract – 2016 LAUD Conference

Institut für Fremdsprachliche Philologien, Fach Anglistik
Universität Koblenz-Landau
April 2016

A pilot study of the linguistic landscape of Beirut began in the Fall of 2015. The data has been collected by mobile crowdsourcing: a group of fifteen Lebanese language students who use the resultant dataset in a course project. At the time of writing this abstract, the total dataset has reached 600 samples from the city of Beirut and its suburbs. After initial analysis, the data model will be refined and the project will continue, running until the Spring of 2017. The linguistic situation of the Lebanese Republic–and in particular the capital city Beirut–is complicated by a number of factors: (1) differing patterns of multilingual practice marked by class and communitarianism, (2) the orthographic possibilities of alternating between Arabic and Latin scripts and Oriental and Western numerals and (4) what I called „audience-specific multilingual non-equivalence.“ Can LL studies say something about the intended audience of different national communities of varied multilingual practices? Unlike notable LL studies that examine the imprint of immigrant communities in specific neighborhoods of diverse metropolitan environments (Blommaerts), this project describes „indigenous“ multilingualisms, without restricting the zones in which data is collected and without prescribing a level of granularity of the data. Instead of qualitative ethnography focusing on deep local context of a small contained area, the project resituates the notion of ethnography in a data-driven, geospatial frame. Geosemantics, and discourses in place (Scollon/Scollon) are replaced with the possibility of spatially-bound multilinguistic patterns.

Written language samples are captured by mobile application and the image samples are human tagged with metadata based on a boundary vocabulary of contextual and linguistic features specific to the Lebanese language situation. The platform employed permits live visualization of the aggregate of the data. It also allows access to a growing database of geotagged images of written samples of language, and their visualization of them on a map interface using queries based on their metadata. The scope of data achieved in a small amount of time produces interesting visual results, but ones that we must „read“ with care. We must create a continuum, including which kinds of language samples are not location-based, which ones might be location-specific, as well as those which are most susceptible to revealing spatial patterns. The overwhelming amount of bilingual samples collected were unsurprisingly English/Arabic. In the paper I will discuss some of the others patterns in LL that the study has found about languages in contact in the Beirut area (Arabic/French, Latin transliteration of Arabic, minority languages as Armenian and Tagalog) as well as refinement needed for the metadata.

Analysis in a data-driven LL study recalls debates in literary studies between distant and close reading, having both affordances and limitations. Larger sets of data reveal patterns that were not previously visible and abstract representations of them (like a map) provide new avenues for contextualizing such data. There is, however, a need for flexible visualization possibilities to keep all scales in mind. Interface design, for example, facilitates an explorative close-distant readings with the possibility to visualize language sample and its metadata in the information box.

Keywords: LL, mobile data collection, map visualization, spatial humanities, digital humanities, GIS, Arab world, network analysis