NYU Abu Dhabi DH Meet Up schedule 2018-19

What is the Digital Humanities Meet Up? 

It is an informal get together featuring a wide array of topics for those interested in, or just curious about, the digital humanities.  It is co-sponsored by the NYU Abu Dhabi Center for Digital Scholarship and the Division of the Arts and Humanities.

 

When will it meet?  

It will meet for approximately one hour during the day every few weeks throughout the Fall and Spring semester.

 

Who can attend?

Anyone in the NYU Abu Dhabi community or beyond.  The meet up is designed to be a learning experience for all.  No particular technical knowledge is required. No RSVP required.

 

Have an idea for a future DH Meet Up? Let us know…

 

Fall 2018 schedule:

 

All meet ups are held in the NYU Abu Dhabi library, C2 329, unless noted below.

 

Wednesday, 19 September, 12-1pm  Taylor Hixson (NYUAD Library, Geospatial Services), Workshop: “An Introduction to Story Maps

 

Monday, 24 September, 1150-105pm  David Wrisley (NYUAD, Digital Humanities), Workshop: “Web Hosting and Digital Identity” 

 

Thursday, 4 October, 2-3pm –  Abdullah Heyari, (NYUAD, Center for Cybersecurity), Workshop: “LaTeX for complete beginners”

 

Monday, 8 October, 1150-105pm – Kaki King (Musician), “Data Not Found”  Different Location C3 116, NYU Abu Dhabi Arts Center

 

Sunday, 4 November, 12-1pm –  Jeremy Farrell (Emory, Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies) – Research presentation and hands on: “Network Approaches to Historical Religious Movements: Early Sufism (9th-10th c. CE) as a Case Study”

 

Tuesday, 20 November, 12-1pm  – David Wrisley (NYUAD, Digital Humanities)  Presentation and hands on: “WikiMedia and the UAE : On Freedom of Panorama, de minimis, and Visual Data in the Creative Commons”

 

Tuesday, 4 December, 12-1pm   –Taylor Hixson (NYUAD Library, Geospatial Services) “Archiving your Digital Spatial Objects in NYU’s Spatial Data Repository

 

Spring 2018 schedule (forthcoming)

Topics for next term:

Digital Scent

Social Networks and Entrepreneurship in the 19th century

Faculty Digital Archive and “green” repositories

 

 

Past DH Meet Ups :

Fall 2016

Spring 2017 

Fall 2017 – Spring 2018

 

 

On Translating Voyant Tools into Arabic

@DJWrisley and @NajlaJarkas1
Department of English
American University of Beirut

Voyant Tools is a “web-based reading and analysis environment for digital texts.”  The developers of Voyant, Stéfan Sinclair and Geoffrey Rockwell, reached out to the international digital humanities community this summer to ask for volunteers to translate it into languages other than English.  My colleague in the Department of English Najla Jarkas and I set out to translate it into Arabic.  Our draft of the translation of the version 2.1 interface can be found here.

Both of us have worked in the domain of Arabic-English-Arabic translation, but neither of us has translated within the specific domain of computing.  The language of Voyant Tools posed a challenge for us, since it blends the lexical fields of interfaces, data analysis and visualization as well as computational textual analysis.  We imagine that it is a new blend of terminology in many languages; it certainly is in Arabic.

We went to the library to check out English-Arabic dictionaries in computational linguistics and computing.  To some extent these were helpful, but other issues concerning the specific meanings used in Voyant arose.  Reading some portions of the co-authors’ new book Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Text Analysis for the Humanities, we were in a better position to understand the blended language of code, tools and explanatory text that make up the Voyant endeavor.  The blogosphere about data analysis, as well as multilingual Wikipedia, were invaluable sources of inspiration.  Microsoft’s language portal was very useful, and yet on some more basic words, we disagreed totally with its doxa.  Take two of its translations of visualization (الرسوم المرئية, مرئيات), literally, “visuals” or “graphical drawings” that we replaced with the Tuftian equivalent of “visual display/presentation” (العرض المرئي).

The language of computing is not fixed across the Arabic-speaking world, but varies according to region and individual usage.  Some terms like interface (واجهة), tools (أدوات) and corpus (مكنز) might provoke very little debate, and yet others like Scatterplot (مخطط التشتت), type/token ratio (نسبة الرموز للانماط), StreamGraph (عرض انسيابي), limited access (وصول محدود) or even skin (غلاف) might be found in print with a considerable amount of variance.

We believe that we have even made some creative interventions in certain cases where either Voyant Tools has perhaps coined new expressions such as conceptual visualization (عرض مرئي مفهومي) or where very recent trends in the digital humanities have done so with notions such as non-consumptive (لا استهلاكي) usage.

How to distinguish between documents and files? between lines and rows? between terms and words?  We wondered sometimes if the base English of Voyant was even consistent. Other most basic issues arose such as the key concept of the query.  Sometimes synonymous with the action of making a term search (عملية البحث), query also meant the contents of that search itself (كلمة البحث).  In the end, our goal was to make the interface as understandable as possible to an Arabic speaker for whom this emergent idiom of digital textual analysis is probably very new.

Theories of translation from English into Arabic are sometimes divided along national and regional lines between adopting equivalence faithful to both the structure and deeper meanings of the Arabic language and more calque-like expressions taken from foreign languages.  Since the theory behind Voyant lies in the creation of functions that can be reused as widgets in different web-based environments, we decided when it came to these names of tools (called Titles in the code) to be as ecumenical as possible.  For example, for the tool Bubbles we transliterated (بوبلز), but also gave an expression more faithful to Arabic (فقاعات).  We followed this strategy throughout providing an equivalence that translates the function of the tool and a transliteration: Workset Builder (ورك سيت بيلدر/ إنشاء المكنز الجزئي), TermsRadio (ترمز راديو /عرض زمني), even the name Voyant Tools itself (فواينت تولز / ادوات فواينت).  The user will discover these binomials positioned prominently in the Arabic interface. The idea was to provide a diversity of Voyant users in Arabic both styles–translation and transliteration–for these iconic titles.

We are aware that our translation is a kind of translingual digital humanities essai and we hope others will jump in to comment and build on our work. We have no doubt made some errors in judgment.  Embedding right-to-left language in HTML was a big challenge and will need to be fixed by others more adept at that process than we are.  We welcome the input of the growing community of regional digital humanists, as well as anyone else who uses the Arabic interface so that we can make it better.  We were humbled by the exercise that will hopefully inspire others to begin to forge a language allowing a broader public to embrace such forms of web-based reading and analysis in the Arabic language.

 

Humanidades digitales hispánicas, Madrid 2015

Humanidades digitales hispánicas
Madrid, 6 de octubre 2015

Titulo: Estilometría como modelización de la transmisión de textos árabes en la Europa medieval: el caso de los Bocados de Oro (Using Stylometry to Model Transmision of Arabic Wisdom Literature in Medieval Europe: the Case of the Bocados de oro)
David Joseph Wrisley
American University of Beirut (Líbano)
@DJWrisley

Visualización 1 (60+ textos en castellano)
Visualización 2 (120+ textos en latín)
Mis diapositivos (en español)


Resumen en ingles:

One instance of knowledge transfer from the Islamic world into medieval Europe that remains understudied is a textual compilation of the lives and sayings of mostly Hellenic philosophers composed in Arabic by al-Mubashshir Ibn Fatik, known as the Mukhtār al-Ḥikam wa-maḥāsin al-kalim (MHMK). Unlike the other Hellenic gnomic collections compiled in Baghdad over the period of the eighth to tenth century (Gutas), al-Mubashshir Ibn Fātik was active in Cairo in the second half of the eleventh century. This means that the text’s genesis is coterminous with the height of Fatimid power and Shi’i Ismaili learning, an influence that emerges prominently in different parts of the compilation. This text circulated in Iberia and was translated into Castilian in the mid-thirteenth century, a fact which facilitated its widespread reception in Europe with subsequent translations into Latin in the thirteenth century, and then into French, Occitan and English all in the fifteenth century.

The significance of studying the tradition should be obvious: it illustrates the transmission of one strand of Greco-Arabica—Mediterranean political and philosophical thought collated by Muslim scholars—into Western Europe. The number of manuscript witnesses of the translations in all languages is considerable—about one hundred twenty at the time of writing—with about seventy in middle French alone. Outside of Hispanist circles, where the MHMK is a well-known influence on thirteenth-century Castilian literature, through the text known as the Bocados de oro, the text’s influence in Italy, the which I claim are heuristically suggestive of the communities in which these translations are likely to have emerged. This research generates new viewpoints from which to consider contexts of textual transmission of works of Arabic origin in medieval Iberia and beyond. Such communities were, however, not monolingual. The bilingual interface with Latin in both the Iberian and French corpus pose certain methodological problems which will be discussed in the paper. I will engage with some of previous hypotheses about authorship, dating and provenance, but I will also point out what we do not yet know about the MHMK tradition and how stylometry points out new paths of inquiry for me.