Student DH Zotero S19

This semester I asked my undergraduates at NYU Abu Dhabi to individualize their learning about topics related to digital humanities by building a Zotero bibliography in my Introduction to DH class. This Spring semester I reorganized the course around themes important in today’s society: computational thinking, digital identity, text as data, dataset, pattern, algorithm, network, location, with different experiments that allowed us to explore these concepts along a spectrum of more human- or more algorithm-centered activity. The Zotero library was an opportunity for them to connect learning in the larger theoretical issues with specific topics of interest to them. The students came from a variety of majors: Computer Science, Interactive Media, Arab Crossroads, Art History, Economics, Music, Social Science, and undecided freshmen.

Our Digital Scholarship head Beth Russell came into the class to introduce Zotero as a citation management system in the first weeks of the semester. By week 3 students had picked a general topic that corresponded to their own interests. Over the course of the term they refined the topic, curating 25 bibliographic entries, tagged and organized in foldesr. We got some very interesting Zotero group libraries. Feel free to build on their open knowledge!

Here are the topics that emerged from student interest in IM-UH 1511 in the Spring 2019 semester:

Generative Digital Art

Applications of Digital Art History

Emotional AI / Affective Computing

Human Matchmaking Algorithms

3d Printing Ethics

The Biometric Industry & Facial Recognition

AI and DH

Dark Skin and Facial Recognition in Photography, Cinematography, and Technology

Machine Learning Popularization

Big Data Analytics and Data Wrangling

Generative Adversarial Networks and Fake Faces

Digital Humanities and Education

ESU DH 2018 – Linguistic Landscapes of Leipzig

Below is a map of the data collected at two iterations (2017 and 2018) of the “Humanities Data and Mapping Environments” at the European Summer University of Digital Humanities, Leipzig, Germany.

The first version of the dataset is published here. Overlays use open data from the city of Leipzig.

 

Map created with R and Shiny by Victor Westrich (U Mainz)

Mapping for the Digital Humanities DHIB 2017

Mapping for the Digital Humanities

Digital Humanities Institute – Beirut in March 2017 (5 hours).
@DJWrisley

Description:

This is a five-hour course that introduces basic elements of modeling spatial data for the humanities, data creation with gazetteers and making simple interactive maps with a symbology appropriate to the data.

Outcomes: 

Participants who complete this workshop will

    • understand the basics of spatial data (formats, types, accuracy).
      gain a basic appreciation for the concept of data modeling
    • learn where they can get spatial data appropriate for humanities inquiry, or how they can create it themselves.
    • gain a basic appreciation of the critical, interpretative side of making a map.
    • experiment with extracting locations from text.
    • appreciate different kinds of spatial data curation (manual, semi-automatic and automatic).
    • use geolocation services on their smartphones to generate some basic data.
    • learn to make a basic interactive map using Carto (and within a web hosting, if skill level permits).

Outline: 

(1) What are spatial data, that is, the data we need to make basic maps?  In what formats, do such data come?

(2) Where can we obtain spatial data? How can we create spatial data?  What is a gazetteer?  What is a spatial repository?

(3) Examples of digital maps projects: Edmonton Pipelines, Mapping Dante, Year of the Riot, Harlem 1935,  London Chatty Map, Slave Revolt in Jamaica, Going to the Show, Mapping the Lake District: A Literary GIS, Linguistic Landscapes of Beirut, Digital Karnak, NYT’s pick, Wandering Rocks, NoSweatShakespeare map, (LOTRLife of Maya Angelou, Novel City Maps), Photogrammar, Literary Geographies of Christine de Pizan, Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, Mapping the Mahjar

(4) Two hands-on examples:

a. Making a map from a text in three “flavors”:  (1) manually (2) semi-automatically using TopoText and (3) automatically using a basic python script (adapted from here).

b. Making a map using data captured with smartphone apps.

(5) How can we stylize those maps and share them with others?

 

See the other spatial humanities workshops and courses I have given. And this bibliography from 2015.

MAA 2016 Toponymic Strata in a Large Corpus of Medieval French

David Joseph Wrisley
@DJWrisley
“Place in Corpora” panel
Medieval Academy of America
Boston, 26 February 2016

Computational models are “however finely perfected, they are temporary states in a process of coming to know, rather than fixed structures of knowledge.” (McCarty, 26)

A view from down under

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visualization 1:  Peripleo.  A geographic view of many different digital objects related to the places of Herodotus.  Click here to explore the same query live.

Herodotus at Peripleo

 

 

Visualization 2: The places of Joinville’s Vie de saint Louis, data by @DJWrisley

places of Joinville

 

Visualization 3: Top 50 Places names in the medieval French corpus.

Visualization 4: The literary geographies of the full corpus of Christine de Pizan.  Open geodata set by myself (about 1000 place names) for download.

CdeP

 

Visualization 5: Full dataset with a Time Slider (almost 10000 place names, 60% geocoded). 

VMP time slider

 

 

 

Visualization 6: A Faceted Browser for Placenames in Medieval (French) Literature (with Stefan Jaenicke, DH 2013) (almost 3000 place names).

Screenshot 2016-02-21 15.30.46

 

Visualization 7: Medieval French corpus place names layover with high population areas c 1300. (base map: Richard Hoffmann)

Visualization 8: Medieval French corpus place names layover with agricultural systems c. 1300. (base map: Richard Hoffmann)


Visualization 9: Comparative Cross-Language Literary Geographies of Marian poetry: Gautier de Coincy, Gonzalo de Berceo, Alfonso el Sabio (Old French, Castilian, Galician) (608 points) (map data by myself)


Visualization 10: Comparative Arabic-French late Medieval Historiography (al-Nuwairi Al-Iskandarani vs. Guillaume de Machaut) (map data by myself, accessible color palette)

 

 

Non-Embedded Works Mentioned:

“Australia on top down under!” Nucolorvue Productions PTY Ltd.

Center for Medieval Studies / Fordham University (2016). Exploring Place in the French of Italy.

Doueihi, M. (2011). Pour un humanisme numérique. Paris: Seuil.

Elliot, T. and S. Gillies (2009). “Digital Geography and Classics“ DHQ 3.1

Hoffmann, R. (2014).  An Environmental History of Medieval Europe. Cambridge: CUP.

Jessop, M. (2008). “The Inhibition of Geographic Information in Digital Humanities Scholarship” LLC 23.1: 39-50.

Mostern, R. et al (2016, forthcoming) Placing Names: Enriching and Integrating Gazetteers. Bloomington: Indiana UP.

Presner, T. and D. Shepard (2016). Mapping the Geospatial Turn” The New Companion to Digital Humanities. Malden, MA/Oxford: Wiley Blackwell.

Simon, R. et al. (2016).  “Peripleo: a Tool for Exploring Heterogeneous Data through the Dimensions of Space and Time”  Code4Lib 31.

Stoa Consortium (2016). Pleiades.

Suard, F. (2011). Guide de la chanson de geste et sa postérité littéraire. Paris: Champion.

Turnator, E. (2015). Summary of the Proceedings of the Linking the Middle Ages“ Workshop.

Wrisley, D. (2016). Visualizing Medieval Places.

Call – Faculty Learning Committee “Digital Humanities at AUB”

 

AMERICAN UNIVERISTY OF BEIRUT

Center for Teaching and Learning

NEW Faculty Learning Community (FLC)

Dear Colleagues,

The Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) would like to announce a new Faculty Learning Community (FLC) entitled DIGITAL HUMANITIES AT AUB. Registration is now open for motivated faculty members, graduate students and professional staff (librarians & IT).   Deadline is extended till February 8, 2016.

For registration please click the link: https://survey.aub.edu.lb/index.php/885891/lang-en

What is a Faculty Learning Community?

It is a “special kind of community of practice,” “a group of trans-disciplinary faculty, graduate students and professional staff group of size 6-15 or more (8 to 12 is the recommended size) engaging in an active, collaborative, yearlong program with a curriculum about enhancing teaching and learning and with frequent seminars and activities that provide learning, development, transdisciplinarity, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and community building…” Read more

This topic-based Faculty Learning Community will focus on the expanding fields of practice called “Digital Humanities.” The “Digital Humanities” are an evolving set of practices that both adapt traditional questions of humanistic scholarship to new digital environments, and open up new modes of inquiry and analysis altogether. Technologies such as data mining, visualization and mapping, and multi-modal archival environments, combined with an increasing numbers of open-access, socially-networked platforms, are not only changing the ways humanists investigate and teach their source material, but are also forging new means of interdisciplinary scholarly communication and research dissemination. The Digital Humanities are a challenge both to the researcher and to the university community in which s/he works.

In this FLC, we will explore theoretical and practical approaches to the humanities in computational environments to analyze, curate and disseminate materials of the human record. We will explore how making and doing in humanities pedagogy and research enact new forms of knowing.  We will also explore new modes of dissemination and scholarly communication. Depending on the interests of the faculty members involved we can explore different media (text, image, sound, objects) as well as various forms of computational analysis.

Check out these two major events already held at AUB on the Digital Humanities in 2013 and 2015.

The purpose of this FLC is for us to try to find answers to the following questions:

1. How are the digital humanities meaningful to our cultural environment?

2. What are we already doing that falls under the DH umbrella?

3. What other kinds of curriculum and research digital innovation could be facilitated at AUB between computing and the humanities?

4. What kinds of curricular structures at AUB might support digital humanities learning?

The Digital Humanities FLC will run for one academic year, from Feb., 2016 to Dec 2016.

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