DHIB 2019: Quantified Self

I will be offering a 10-hour workshop at the Digital Humanities Institute Beirut (DHIB), 4-5 May 2019. It is a miniature version of a course I will be teaching at NYU Abu Dhabi in Fall 2019.

NB: This is a preliminary outline of the course. It will be updated as the time comes closer.

Brief description: This ten-hour workshop will explore elements of the contemporary “quantified self” movement and its claims to “self-knowledge through numbers” focusing on contexts outside of the West/global North. It adopts a data-centered approach to gather, analyze and visualize data about the self in order to evaluate the phenomenon critically.

Requirements: Participants should come with a laptop and a smartphone (iOS or Android) with plenty of charge each day.

Outcomes. Participants in this workshop will:

  1. explore basic arguments in the contemporary context of self-tracking and the datafication of human life.
  2. be exposed to relevant issues in information privacy related to device usage and commercial data aggregation.
  3. collect some data about themselves in familiar surroundings
  4. practice data storytelling techniques reusing that data (map visualization, plotting).
  5. discuss to what extent these data reflect their own life experience, or constitute “self-knowledge”.
  6. examine critically the risks and benefits of QS applications for emerging and vulnerable environments.

Breakdown

Saturday 4 May, 0900-1130 — Session 1

  • introduction to quantified self (QS) movement and to its globalization in the public & health sectors.
  • discussion of data privacy, geo-privacy, app gamification.
  • exploration of the data collection capacities of a smartphone / wearable technologies.
  • lunch exercise: observing the data collection apps already on your phone.

Saturday 4 May, 1430-1700 — Session 2

  • exploration of self-tracking apps: their functions, gamified nature, benefits and drawbacks, the exportability of data
  • working with a couple apps to set up (temporal & spatial) data collection exercise for a one day period.

Sunday 5 May, 0900-1130 — Session 3

  • debriefing about data collection: findings and shortcomings.
  • discussion of a few short passages from critical literature on QS and media studies (Maturo/Moretti; Rettberg; Wernimont; Lupton).
  • exporting the data from the apps.
  • presentation of relevant data visualization techniques.
  • lunch exercise: completing your data collection, if you haven’t already at night.

Sunday 5 May, 1430-1700 — Session 4

  • reusing that data for storytelling purposes (map visualization, plotting).
  • wrap up.

NYU Abu Dhabi DH Meet Up schedule 2018-19

What is the Digital Humanities Meet Up? 

It is an informal get together featuring a wide array of topics for those interested in, or just curious about, the digital humanities.  It is co-sponsored by the NYU Abu Dhabi Center for Digital Scholarship and the Division of the Arts and Humanities.

 

When will it meet?  

It will meet for approximately one hour during the day every few weeks throughout the Fall and Spring semester.

 

Who can attend?

Anyone in the NYU Abu Dhabi community or beyond.  The meet up is designed to be a learning experience for all.  No particular technical knowledge is required. No RSVP required.

 

Have an idea for a future DH Meet Up? Let us know…

 

Fall 2018 schedule:

 

All meet ups are held in the NYU Abu Dhabi library, C2 329, unless noted below.

 

Wednesday, 19 September, 12-1pm  Taylor Hixson (NYUAD Library, Geospatial Services), Workshop: “An Introduction to Story Maps

 

Monday, 24 September, 1150-105pm  David Wrisley (NYUAD, Digital Humanities), Workshop: “Web Hosting and Digital Identity” 

 

Thursday, 4 October, 2-3pm –  Abdullah Heyari, (NYUAD, Center for Cybersecurity), Workshop: “LaTeX for complete beginners”

 

Monday, 8 October, 1150-105pm – Kaki King (Musician), “Data Not Found”  Different Location C3 116, NYU Abu Dhabi Arts Center

 

Sunday, 4 November, 12-1pm –  Jeremy Farrell (Emory, Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies) – Research presentation and hands on: “Network Approaches to Historical Religious Movements: Early Sufism (9th-10th c. CE) as a Case Study”

 

Tuesday, 20 November, 12-1pm  – David Wrisley (NYUAD, Digital Humanities)  Presentation and hands on: “WikiMedia and the UAE : On Freedom of Panorama, de minimis, and Visual Data in the Creative Commons”

 

Tuesday, 4 December, 12-1pm   –Taylor Hixson (NYUAD Library, Geospatial Services) “Archiving your Digital Spatial Objects in NYU’s Spatial Data Repository

 

Spring 2018 schedule (forthcoming)

Topics for next term:

Digital Scent

Social Networks and Entrepreneurship in the 19th century

Faculty Digital Archive and “green” repositories

 

 

Past DH Meet Ups :

Fall 2016

Spring 2017 

Fall 2017 – Spring 2018

 

 

Semi-Automated Alignment with iTeal

Semi-Automated Alignment of Text Versions with iteal

A half-day tutorial at DH2018, CDMX, Mexico, June 2018

with

Stefan Jänicke  @vizcovery

David Joseph Wrisley  @djwrisley

 

Overview

 

Our half-day tutorial for DH2018 concerns the semi-automated alignment of different witnesses in complex textual traditions, with demonstration of specific use cases, a discussion of the relevance of the implemented system to particular textual problems relevant to the participants as well as a hands on discovery of the system. Alignment is a relatively simple task for modern languages with orthographic stability and relatively similar texts, but when there is a degree of instability of textual transmission as in oral literatures, popular music or poetry, or other complex texts with partial repetition the task becomes more difficult. Whereas methods of hand aligning and visualizing texts exists in TEI, we focus on the possibility of computational alignment for the purpose of exploratory textual visualization. Scholars who are interested in visualizing scaled forms of reading will be interested in this tutorial.

Our visual analytics environment iteal supports the computational alignment of textual similarities and is not English-specific. It was originally implemented using orally inflected medieval French poetic texts (with test cases of the fabliaux and epic) and so is known to work on texts in Latin alphabets with inconsistent orthography.

This half-day tutorial aims at introducing iteal to the DH community for which the questions of multi-text problems, spelling variance and debates about distant forms of reading are currently quite salient. Many language processing and visualization tools do not work well with languages beyond English. Our environment is known to work with languages beyond English will be of interest those interested in expanding innovative techniques in the textual humanities across the North/South divide. Participants of the tutorial will be led in a step-by-step, hands-on approach through the full cycle of an iteal-based text alignment workflow, and they will finally have the opportunity of testing the tool with their own data. Although proven to be effectively useful for text variants of medieval poetry, we will not focus only on this type of text as iteal can be used to determine alignments among texts of a different kind in any language and in multiple genres. Currently, iteal works with plain text in utf8.

 

iteal consists of two major modules:

First, it automatically determines line-to-line alignments pairwise between all given text editions based on user-configurable parameters including:

  • Edit distance: Variant spellings are taken into account by this function. We define two words as spelling variants if they have the same first letter, and if the string similarity of the remaining substrings is higher than a user-configurable threshold.
  • Coverage: In order to ensure that a specific proportion of words of both lines are aligned, the user can configure a minimum coverage value of the line.
  • N-grams: The user can configure the minimum required n-gram size n that is the largest number of subsequent word matches of both lines.
  • Broken n-grams: Quite often, the only difference between two lines is a single word in the middle of a line that is either inserted, synonymous, or a transposed stopword. Large n-grams, from this perspective are not achieved. Thus, we allow the user for considering broken n-grams, which is the total number of word matches among both lines.

Second, for the purpose of analyzing the determined alignment we provide interactive visualizations for different text hierarchy levels (examples for all three views can be found in Figures 1, 2 and 3, and a teaser outlining a brief workflow with iteal can be found at https://vimeo.com/230829975):

  • Distant Reading: In order to get a rough overview of alignment patterns throughout the observed text versions, we draw a miniature representation for each version in the form of a vertical bar reflecting its number of verse lines in contrast to the other shown versions. For us, this is the most distant form of reading, where the text itself is not visualized, but rather abstract depictions of textual similarity point to patterns worth discovering.
  • Meso Reading: Since multiple texts are displayed in synoptic views, the visualization is able to convey more complex patterns of textual relationship. We call this a meso reading that might be said to connect multiple close readings all the while transmitting information that lies beyond the scope of a close reading. Here, we use the intuitivity of stream graphs to connect aligned verse lines among different versions. For a more detailed inspection of an individual alignment, clicking on a stream opens a popup window for line-level close reading.
  • Close Reading: Next to plain text, the close reading view provides word level alignments for the corresponding verse lines in the form of two Variant Graph visualizations. Within the close reading view, individual alignments can be confirmed with user input, so that it gets persistently stored in the backend.

Target audience: Anyone studying variance in the textual digital humanities and its visualization would be interested in our tutorial. It will be offered in English, but can accommodate textual data in a variety of languages. Potential participants in the tutorial are encouraged to be in touch with the presenters in advance of DH2018 to provide some sample data that can used to provide a mashup. Required for this step is a version of at least two documents sharing some text in common, of at least 20 lines. 

 

Schedule #itealDH

 

Part I (1 hour + break time)

iteal introduction: purpose, functionality, configuration, visualization (Stefan Jänicke)

– Medieval French poetry as an iteal use case (David J. Wrisley)

– Further use cases, future work, questions (Stefan Jänicke & David J. Wrisley)

Break

Part II (2 hours – break time)

– Step-by-step hands-on session with texts brought by tutorial participants
– wrap up, feedback and steps forward

 

 

Bios

Stefan Jänicke

Dr. Stefan Jänicke is a post-doctoral researcher at the Image and Signal Processing Group at Leipzig University, Germany, where he leads a text visualization group focusing on applications in the digital humanities. Over the last years, he has gained experience in developing information visualization and visual analytics techniques within a number of digital humanities projects. His PhD thesis investigates the utility of visualization techniques to support the comparative analysis of digital humanities data, and his current research relates to information visualization with a focus on applications for text- and geovisualization in digital humanities.

David Joseph Wrisley

Dr. David Joseph Wrisley is Associate Professor of Digital Humanities at New York University Abu Dhabi. His research interests include the creation of open, inclusive corpora in medieval studies, corpus-based geovisualization as well as visual exploration of variance in poetic traditions. Furthermore, he is interested in the challenges in humanities data stemming from both multilingual environments and social data creation.

 

Related References 

Jänicke, A. Geßner, M. Büchler and G. Scheuermann (2014). Visualizations for Text Re-use. In: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Information Visualization Theory and Applications (VISIGRAPP 2014), pp 59–70.

Jänicke, A. Geßner, M. Büchler and G. Scheuermann (2014). 5 Design Rules for Visualizing Text Variant Graphs. In: Conference Abstracts of the Digital Humanities 2014.

Jänicke, A. Geßner, G. Franzini, M. Terras, S. Mahony and G. Scheuermann (2015). TRAViz: A Visualization for Variant Graphs. In: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 30, suppl 1, pp i83–i99.

Jänicke, G. Franzini, M. F. Cheema and G. Scheuermann (2015). On Close and Distant Reading in Digital Humanities: A Survey and Future Challenges. In: Eurographics Conference on Visualization (EuroVis) – STARs. The Eurographics Association.

Jänicke and D. J. Wrisley (2016). Visualizing Mouvance: Towards an Alignment of Medieval Vernacular Text Traditions. In: Conference Abstracts of the Digital Humanities 2016.

Jänicke and D. J. Wrisley (2017). Visualizing Mouvance: Towards a Visual Analysis of Variant Medieval Text Traditions. In: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 32, suppl 2, pp ii106–ii123.

Jänicke and D. J. Wrisley (2017). Interactive Visual Alignment of Medieval Text Versions. In: IEEE Conference on Visual Analytics Science and Technology, IEEE VAST 2017.

 

 

 

Abstracts, American University of Paris, March 2017

Abstracts

 

David Joseph Wrisley
djwrisley.com @DJWrisley
American University of Paris
16-17 March 2017

 

Lecture: “Digital Project-Based Scholarship and Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts Institution”
Thursday, March 16, 2017, 1530-1700, Combes 102    Watch the lecture here.

My talk focuses on the genre of the digital project and its potential for scholarly and pedagogical reflection in the liberal arts institution.  From a general discussion of some exemplary projects carried out in small colleges by teams of faculty, students, librarians and technologists, in what might be called the humanities “laboratory” (Lane), I will chart how digital methods can evolve from course-embedded experiments to larger research projects.  I hope to show that such projects, in both process and product, embody the values of a liberal arts education in the 21st century: a well-rounded education, social and ethical awareness and creative, multidisciplinary synthesis.  I will discuss in detail two course-embedded digital projects that I carried out with my students in Beirut: Linguistic Landscapes of Beirut and Mapping Beirut Print Culture.  As we will see, projects, like the scholars and institutions that embark upon them, grow in stages of increasing digital scholarly complexity (ILiADS).  Finally, I will point to some attempts to build “communities of practice” among liberal arts colleges, and the establishment of lab-like commons and other institutional structures that serve as the loci for such project-based local knowledge production.

 

Hands-on session: “Toolkit or Toychest?: the Digital in the Classroom”
Friday, March 17, 2017, 11h00 – 14h00, Combes 104

This hands on session will put into practice some of the ideas laid forth in Thursday’s lecture.  It will look at some simple, off-the-shelf tools for digital tasks, and move on to more complex (or even combined) tasks that are useful for collecting, analyzing and disseminating research data. The session aims to make participants aware of some of the emergent categories of tools for research & pedagogy, as well as to discuss the degrees of openness that they embody.  The session argues for the productive tension between the functional (the tool) and the ludic (the toy), suggesting that the digital does not simplify or merely quantify, but rather opens the door to critical play and reflection with tools.  Participants will try out basic functionality of some of the following environments and will discuss together how they might be integrated into critical classroom praxis: Voyant, TypeWright, FromThePage, Prism, Hypothes.is, Google Fusion Tables, TopoText, Odyssey.js, Palladio, NodeGoat, Sketchup, JSTOR analyze, ZoteroWordPress.org.  

Helpful, but not necessary, preparations for the workshop: Make accounts at TypeWrightHypothes.is, Google (if you have a gmail it is enough), Carto.  Download Sketchup and either Zotero standalone (and its Chrome plugin).

 

 

 

Additional Reading:

Bilansky “TypeWright: An Experiment in Participatory Curation
Doueihi, Pour un humanisme numérique
Dumouchel, “
Les Humanités Numériques: une nouvelle discipline universitaire?
dwhly, “Annotation is Now a Web Standard
El Khatib et al., “TopoText: Interactive Digital Mapping of Literary Text
Ferrari Nieto, Enrique. Resistencias con lo Digital
Gefen et al., “Qu’est-ce que les humanités numériques?
Jannidis et al., Digital Humanities: 
Eine Einführung
Lane, The Big Humanities
Liu, DH ToyChest
Mounier, ed. Read/Write Book 2: Une introduction aux humanités numériques
Nowviskie, “How to Play with Maps”
Numerico et al, L’umanista digitale (Eng tr. The Digital Humanist: A Critical Inquiry)
Burdick et al, Digital_Humanities
Puckett, 
Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers, and Educators
Rockwell and Sinclair, Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities
Sketchfab, “Around the World in 80 Models
Svensson, Big Digital Humanities
Unsworth, “Scholarly Primitives

A Very Gentle Intro to 3d and Sketchup DHIB 2017

Description:

This is a 2.5 hour course that introduces the use of 3d for the humanities and looks at Sketchup briefly.

Outcomes: 

Participants who complete this workshop will

    • explore some examples of 3d for the humanities 
    • discuss some theories of 3d for the humanities and potential applications
    • learn where they can get 3d shape files to begin to manipulate themselves
    • model a basic objects in Sketchup

Outline: 

(1) What is 3d? Why might we want to work in 3D? In what formats do 3d objects come?

(2) Where can we find open 3d content? SketchfabThingiverse3duniverse, Sketchup’s 3dwarehouse and Yeggi

(3) Examples of projects:  The Nilein Mosque (Sudan)1853 Richmond and its Slave MarketVirtual WilliamsburgA 3d model of the Abu Dhabi Volcano Fountain / Forma Urbis / Simulating Gothic Arches / Musée Charles X / What Jane Saw / Virtual Monastery / Off the Map / Rome Reborn / Mapping Soweto / Edge Hill 3D parametric modeling / Unity 3D Schooner / Hadrian’s Villa / 3DHOP / 1893 Columbian Exhibition / Virtual Harlem / The Sound of 18th century Paris / Virtual Paul’s Cross Project / Reconstituições virtuais de Teatros (Lisbon) / Visualizing Early Baltimore / Heritage Together / Z-axis Mapping / Triumphal Arch / Dubai 3d printed architecture 

(4) What would you model in 3d and why?

(4) Two hands-on examples:

a. Making a basic object (say, the Issam Fares Building designed by Zaha Hadid at AUB).

On this building see here.
b. Geolocating the object

(5) How can we share those objects in the medium? WordPress plugin

 

Readings: 

Champion, Playing with the Past.
Jaskot et al.Visualizing the Archive: Building at Auschwitz as a Geographic Problem”.
der Manuelian, “Giza 3d: The Real-Time Immersive Experience” Digital Giza, 124-153.
Kenderdine, “Embodiment, Entanglement, and Immersion in Digital Cultural Heritage” New Companion to Digital Humanities, 22-41.